Blue Mountains World Heritage Institute researches secret life of dingoes

THE Blue Mountains World Heritage is turning to the crowdfunding platform Pozible to help it fund the purchase of cameras that can be left in the field to capture the secret life of dingoes. 

The Blue Mountains World Heritage Institute is undertaking much needed dingo research and is asking the community to participate with some crowd funding for the project. Photo: Michael Small.

The Blue Mountains World Heritage Institute is undertaking much needed dingo research and is asking the community to participate with some crowd funding for the project. Photo: Michael Small.

 “Recent research shows that dingoes may have a valuable role in the survival of small native mammal species. Dingoes as the top predator in Australian ecosystems are pivotal to maintaining species balance,” said Dr Rosalie Chapple, Executive Director, Blue Mountains World Heritage Institute.

“We need to know more — we need to better understand the dynamics between native and introduced species and what it means for our ecosystems, while also protecting our agricultural production.”

Daniel Hunter, a PhD student at the University of NSW, took up the challenge — but he needs help.

“I want to place cameras at key points throughout the World Heritage Area including the Megalong (Green Gully), Kanangra, North Wollemi and Yengo,” he said.

“Each camera costs several hundred dollars. Pozible are helping us reach you, the public, in order to raise funds for this research.”

The information gained by this valuable research can help guide future management of dingoes that recognises both their relationship to native ecosystems and to neighbouring landholders.

The Pozible campaign runs until June 23 at: http://pozible.com/dingocam.

For further information about the Institute and the dingo research project visit:  www.bmwhi.org.au; or www.dingo.bmwhi.org.au.

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