End to sneaky oils and bush dumping

Mayor Mark Greenhill, NSW Environment Minister, Rob Stokes, Blue Mountains MP Roza Sage, Clr Cri Van der Kley and Stephen Hill, site co-ordinator at Katoomba Waste Management Facility look at some of the bottles of cooking oils delivered to the tip hidden in other waste.

Mayor Mark Greenhill, NSW Environment Minister, Rob Stokes, Blue Mountains MP Roza Sage, Clr Cri Van der Kley and Stephen Hill, site co-ordinator at Katoomba Waste Management Facility look at some of the bottles of cooking oils delivered to the tip hidden in other waste.

Those old paint tins, fluorescent light tubes and gas cylinders cluttering up the shed, awaiting the twice-yearly council disposal day, will soon be able to be dropped off at Katoomba tip any time, thanks to a state government grant.

The NSW environment minister, Rob Stokes, announced last week that Blue Mountains Council will receive $65,627 to build a community recycling centre at the Katoomba waste management facility.

This will mean a permanent service for residents to drop off rubbish that can't be put in the regular garbage bins, including paints, oils, batteries and smoke detectors.

The money is part of a program, Waste Less Recycle More, run by the Environment Protection Authority, which is dedicated to improving waste collections and rolling out new recycling centres across the state.

Blue Mountains mayor, Clr Mark Greenhill, said council was thrilled to receive the grant and very appreciative of the state government's program.

"This new community recycling centre will provide a permanent and convenient service for Blue Mountains residents to drop off problem waste. By expanding our recycling and resource recovery facilities, especially for hazardous waste items, council can make it easier for residents to waste less and recycle more, extending the life of our city's landfill."

Blue Mountains MP, Roza Sage, welcomed the grant and commended the council for applying for it.

"This centre will include safe storage facilities for lead acid batteries and will form part of a comprehensive resource recovery operation at Katoomba," she said.

"I look forward to seeing the new facility up and running."

Many residents hide forbidden items inside bags or within other bits of rubbish, said Katoomba Waste Facility site co-ordinator, Stephen Hill.

Staff then have to remove them and set them aside.

He hoped the new facility would put an end to the sneaky dealings.

The mayor also hoped the new centre would have a "positive effect on illegal dumping", encouraging people to use the tip rather than the bush to dispose of their waste.

The new permanent drop-off is expected to be open around February next year.

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