Springwood High School's Year 10 students were just some of the 20,000 NSW teenagers to take part in the confronting bstreetsmart course organised by Sydney's Westmead Hospital Trauma Unit.

Students witnessed vivid re-creations of car crashes.

Students witnessed vivid re-creations of car crashes.

Students witnessed vivid re-creations of car crashes.

Students witnessed vivid re-creations of car crashes.

Students witnessed vivid re-creations of car crashes.

Students witnessed vivid re-creations of car crashes.

Springwood High School's Alice Dowling, Kaia Thomson and Josh Green participated in the course.

Springwood High School's Alice Dowling, Kaia Thomson and Josh Green participated in the course.

It's an event meant to reduce the fatality rates of young people by promoting safe behaviour as drivers, riders and passengers.

Springwood High School's Year 10 students were just some of the 20,000 NSW teenagers to take part in the confronting bstreetsmart course organised by Sydney's Westmead Hospital Trauma Unit and now in its ninth year.

Springwood High School PE teacher Ethan Simone said students were learning about road safety in class and the car crash re-enactments and moving stories from young car crash survivors worked well with course material.

"Being a young teacher I am aware of the risks that young people face on the road and have witnessed risk-taking behaviours first hand. These types of programs are extremely beneficial and I am really happy that Springwood High School feels it's important for the school to attend."

Josh Green, 15, said sometimes shock tactics were needed to get the message across to his generation.

"I think it's unfortunate that's what it has come to," he said.

Classmate Alice Dowling, 15, added she "didn't realise it would be so realistic. It was very gory."

Already more than 50 young people have died in car accidents in NSW this year and the NRMA says a 17-year-old P-plater is four times more likely to be involved in a fatal crash than someone over 26 years old.

Kaia Thomson, 16, who is currently learning to drive, says driving takes a lot of concentration and she wouldn't dream of answering a text message in a car.

"I always leave my phone at home. I find even when you get in a conversation [in the car] it is distracting. I don't check my speed and mirrors as much and find it harder to concentrate."

The program was started in 2006 by Westmead Hospital trauma coordinators, Julie Seggie and Stephanie Wilson. In the past eight years, more than 85,000 students from 323 schools have attended the award-winning program which has proven to be so effective it has been replicated in Western Australia and South Australia.

Research conducted by the University of New South Wales Injury Risk Management Research Centre has shown that students leave the bstreetsmart event with a changed attitude to driving and are more likely to retain road safety messages for an extended time.

"The car crash dramatisation really hits home for many of the students," Ms Seggie said.

"Listening to real life stories presented by car crash survivors with a brain or spinal injury makes it very clear that they are not invincible, it could happen to them.

"It also highlights the impact crashes have ... on friends and family as well."

The Baird government has extended the program's funding for another four years.

The course is for Year 10-12 students: www.bstreetsmart.org.

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