Carnivorous plants at Mt Tomah

A Carnivorous Plant Fair full of mini-monsters will kick off this Saturday (December 3) at the Blue Mountains Botanic Garden Mount Tomah, giving visitors the chance to meet plants of the meat-eating variety. 

The fair will give visitors a peek at some of the quirkiest plants around - complete with a plant sale where guests can bag their very own carnivorous plant to take home and a mini exhibit curated by one of the world’s leading carnivorous plant experts, Greg Bourke.

With bite: The carnivorous plant fair at Mt Tomah features myriad meat-eating plants. There are a number of programs for both children and adults..

With bite: The carnivorous plant fair at Mt Tomah features myriad meat-eating plants. There are a number of programs for both children and adults..

“‘Carnis are the oddities of the plant world, they can survive in low nutrient soil with a ‘diet’ of insects and even rats,” said Mr Bourke (curator manager of the Blue Mountains Botanic Garden Mount Tomah).

“They lure and ensnare their prey with traps, some of which can fire open and shut as quickly as within one two-hundredth of a second. That’s faster than you can blink.”

“These plants have such charm about them and they are increasingly becoming recognised as a critical part of our natural ecosystem. Australia has some 235 native carnivorous plant varieties, but people still know so little about them.

“So drop by, browse the collections and get involved with this special event. What better way to learn about these voracious little beasts living in our own backyard?”

Join the Carnivorous Plant Fair fun with:

Dinner Time Doom (December 3rd plus January 13th, 20th and 27th). Just for kids, this fun adventure uncovers how carnivorous plants lure and eat their prey. Includes games and a pet ‘carni’ to take home.

Carnivorous Considerations (December 5th and 9th). Join a senior horticulturalist for a workshop guide to growing carnivorous plants with tips on growing and propagating special varieties.

Bog Garden Bash (December 6th and 8th). Take an intimate tour to see and learn about the carnivorous plant species brought to life by a naturally occurring murky Blue Mountains bog.

Another reason to visit Mt Tomah gardens at the moment, the exquisite puya is in flower and will be until mid-January. With two- to three-metre tall spikes covered in bright turquoise blossoms, these exotic flowers from Chile only bloom once at the end of their seven-year life cycle.

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