Fridge buyback scheme proves popular in Blue Mountains

Mayor Mark Greenhill prepares an unused second fridge for Fridge Buyback to save money and reduce greenhouse gases.

Mayor Mark Greenhill prepares an unused second fridge for Fridge Buyback to save money and reduce greenhouse gases.

More than 1500 spare fridges and upright freezers have been recycled by Blue Mountains residents thanks to Fridge Buyback, an award-winning residential energy saving scheme.

Most second fridges tend to be old, energy guzzlers that are very inefficient and add an average of $300 to individual power bills each year.

By unplugging and recycling their spare appliance, the Blue Mountains Fridge Buyback participants are enjoying a combined saving of $448,200 per year and have prevented the release of 11,720 tonnes of greenhouse gases.

“With power prices increasing by an average of $200 per household, I encourage residents to carefully consider the need for their spare fridge or freezer,” said Blue Mountains mayor, Mark Greenhill.

“Not only will they be saving up to up to $300 a year off their power bill, they will be helping environment by reducing greenhouse pollution.”

The appliances are degassed and the metals recycled, making it the most environmentally sustainable way to dispose of a fridge or upright freezer.

“Fridge Buyback’s free collection service makes it easy to get rid of your spare fridge,” said the mayor.

To participate, fridges or upright freezers must be a working second appliance that has been in regular use and is 200 litres or more in size. A $25 rebate is paid for collection from homes with six steps or less.

The next collection in the Blue Mountains is March 9. Call 1800 708 401 or visit www.fridgebuyback.com.au for more information and to book a collection.

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