Winter gardening in the Blue Mountains

TOP PICK: Camellias are hardy and disease-resistant and come in a wide range of colours.

TOP PICK: Camellias are hardy and disease-resistant and come in a wide range of colours.

There is still plenty of gardening to do these winter months. Especially with the weather being so kind, with minimal rain and lovely sunny days.

BACK IN FASHION: Hardy plants in a decorative pot will brighten up your indoor space.

BACK IN FASHION: Hardy plants in a decorative pot will brighten up your indoor space.

If you would like to add some winter colour to your garden, camellias are a good choice. They look great in pots, as a feature tree and even make a great hedge.

With lots of colours and varieties to choose from, flowering starts in autumn and continues through the cooler months, right through to early spring. They have attractive glossy green foliage and come in a large range of colours. 

Camellias are hardy and disease-resistant and generally like a semi-shaded position in your garden. The two most popular and common varieties are Camellia Sasanquas, which are more sun tolerant, and Camellia Japonicas which prefer shade. Feed each autumn and Spring and you will be rewarded with beautiful blooms all winter.

In the vegetable patch it’s time to plant your winter brassicas, such as broccoli, cauliflower, cabbage and brussels sprouts. Watch out for those pesky white cabbage moth caterpillars that will devour your brassicas. Cover your veggie patch with netting or use a pyrethrum ready to use spray to deter them.

It’s also a great time of year for citrus trees. Mandarins are in season during the cooler months and are a great way of adding some homegrown food to your garden.

There are a few varieties to choose from such as the Emperor Mandarin, the Imperial Mandarin, and dwarf varieties. Citrus love food so feed once every autumn and spring with a specialised fertiliser.

Keep an eye out in your local nursery for new season roses. Winter is the time to plant out these beauties and they come in an amazing array of colours and fragrances.

When planting out your new rose prepare your soil beforehand with compost, manure, and some blood and bone. Once your rose is planted, mulch and keep well watered.

Winter is also the time to prune any existing roses in your garden. Wait until they lose their leaves, then remove any dead stems and cut all remaining healthy stems down to knee height.

And if you don’t feel like going outside then why not garden inside? Shout yourself to an indoor plant and put it in a decorative pot to brighten up your indoor space.

There are a great range of indoor plants and pots available so keep a look out for these hardy indoor plants, Sansevieria, Fiddle Leaf Figs, and Spathiphyllum.

  • Article courtesy of Glenbrook Village Nursery, 20 Ross Street, Glenbrook: www.glenbrookvillagenursery.com.au