Adani coal mine a target of new concert

Witches Leap
Witches Leap

The old time fiddle and banjo music of the American Appalachian Mountains is historically entwined with the old coal mining communities of that region, but on Saturday, February 17, old timey musicians will be teaming up with their Irish counterparts at the Paragon Café to raise funds and awareness to fight the huge Adani coal mine planned in Queensland.

Whoa Mule

Whoa Mule

Local trio Witches Leap put a contemporary drive on to the traditional music of old Ireland, filtering it through the hanging swamps of the Blue Mountains and cutting it with original convict-noir folk songs of black bushrangers and errant redcoats.

Along with the song-writing of Paddy Connor, of the local folk band Lime and Steel, Witches Leap features the earthy tones of the Irish flute, bouzouki and uilleann pipes, the rarely seen and evocative Irish bagpipes.

With driving fiddle-banjo tunes and original songs, Whoa Mule affectionately reimagines old time American music with both space and energy. Bringing together musicians from the Blue Mountains and the Inner West of Sydney, this all-female four-piece has won over audiences at folk festivals across Australia.

There will also be a short information talk from Dr Sujata Allan, representing the group Front Line Action on Coal, about recent developments on the campaign to stop the controversial coal mine.

This is a chance for the passengers to go below decks on the Titanic for a night of foot-stomping fiddles, Irish pipes and political dissent. Paragon Folk presents Whoa Mule and Witches Leap on Saturday, February 17. Doors open from 7:30, with tickets $20 or $15 concession/presale at trybooking.com.