Tashi's Tibetan treats at Blackheath

Variety: Oysters and lamb (probably best sampled separately, not together).
Variety: Oysters and lamb (probably best sampled separately, not together).

A meeting of minds at a yoga and meditation centre in northern India 17 years ago changed the course of Kelsang Tashi’s life.

Treats from Foodsmith.

Treats from Foodsmith.

At the time he was working as a cook at the centre. There he met Susie, who would become his wife. They have made the Mountains their home, living in Springwood and raising two “beautiful daughters”.

And Mr Tashi is gradually introducing locals to his home-made Tibetan curries.

Kelsang Tashi: Tashi's Tibetan curries have no unhealthy additives.

Kelsang Tashi: Tashi's Tibetan curries have no unhealthy additives.

“I do all the different curries, which are gluten free and dairy free,” he said. “I don’t add salt, sugar, preservatives or colouring.”

Mr Tashi has been plying his trade at the markets for more than three years.

At Blackheath on the second Sunday of every month, the neighbouring tent also features Tibetan food – dumplings (called momo).

Other parts of the world are also celebrated at Blackheath. Andy’s Yum Cha Snack does a popular line in dim sims and dumplings. The Taj Mahal sells curries, fish cakes and samosas. Eats Really Yummy features Taiwanese food and the Turkish gozleme and Dutch pancakes are also regulars.

One of the latest additions to the market scene is Foodsmith, which offers, among other things, wholefood and vegan ice cream sandwiches.

With gluten-free cakes, oysters, lamb and the mouth-watering Trunkey bacon and egg rolls, the markets offer something for pretty much everyone.