Slow Food Blue Mountains has new initiative to get more pulses on menus

Slow Food Blue Mountains has started creating a  foodie trail  to encourage more Australian-grown pulses on the menu in local restaurants, cafes and other food-related businesses.

Slow Food Blue Mountains member  James Howarth of Leura Garage Restaurant,  with staff members Luca Postiglione and  Cathy Brown at the launch of their brand new lentil and chick pea burger.

Slow Food Blue Mountains member James Howarth of Leura Garage Restaurant, with staff members Luca Postiglione and Cathy Brown at the launch of their brand new lentil and chick pea burger.

“We want to position the Blue Mountains as a centre of excellence and  a leader in promoting plant-forward fare, showing the world community we are serious about providing positively delicious alternatives to  help combat climate change,” said Anne Elliott, Convivium Leader, SFBM.  

Australia has been a major producer of pulses for decades - particularly in Western Australia, NSW and South Australia and these inexpensive,  carbon-sinking and versatile little powerhouses are also packed with protein .

Being nitrogen-fixing, they are great for Australia’s ancient and fragile soils. The inclusion of pulses in cropping rotation  has the added bonus, too, of providing an opportunity to move away from dependence on chemicals to control weeds.

Any business putting pulses on the menu can use the specially-created We’re Lentil As anything – Pulses on Our Menu  decal by simply contacting Slow Food Blue Mountains. The group will then provide copies of the decal as well as adding details of their pulse-inspired fare to our We’re Lentil As Anything Trail, which we hope will eventually be a self-guided trail meandering – albeit slowly – throughout the Blue Mountains region.

The trail will be published on the Slow Food Blue Mountains website at www.slowfoodbluemountains.com.au.

According to the FAO, global meat consumption has increased five-fold since the mid 1950s  (mainly through the industrialisation of agriculture) with a projected doubling by 2050 – an obviously unsustainable level further compounding existing problems with  deteriorating soil and water quality, animal welfare and community health. Consumption of pulses, eating more fruit and vegetables and taking meat off centre plate, offer sustainable solutions to this alarming statistic.

Slow Food Blue Mountains member James Howarth of Leura Garage Restaurant has introduced a lentil and chick pea burger.

“The Leura Garage is always looking at ways to change our menu and engage in sustainable hospitality practices – our staff , customers and community demand it,” said Mr Howarth. “Come in and try our Slow Food Lentil Burger. It is made in-house by our kitchen mechanics and is flying out the door. Locals get a 10 per cent discount Monday to Friday and we are open every day from noon.”

Slow Food Blue Mountains is part of the international not-for-profit Slow Food Movement .  Simply put, we believe everyone has the right to access good, clean and fair food. Find out more or join Slow Food at www.slowfoodbluemountains.com.au or  email: sfbm@slowfoodaustralia.com.au.