Glenbrook Lagoon captured by artist Corinne Loxton

The tranquility and beauty of Glenbrook Lagoon has long captivated the hearts of traveller and local inhabitant alike.

Stunning: Mountains landscape painter, Corinne Loxton, is currently exploring the spirit of Glenbrook Lagoon in a series of paintings to be exhibited in October in Katoomba.

Stunning: Mountains landscape painter, Corinne Loxton, is currently exploring the spirit of Glenbrook Lagoon in a series of paintings to be exhibited in October in Katoomba.

A natural spring, the lagoon was a vital water source for Indigenous people who fished and bathed in the oasis which was home to fish, turtles, eels, amphibians, reptiles and native bird life. 

After Lawson, Wentworth and Blaxland crossed the Blue Mountains in 1813, the lagoon was established for a short time as a provisions depot for the military.  It was used again after 1867 as a water source for the steam trains that had just climbed the Lapstone ZigZag. Unfortunately due to urbanisation, the use of the lagoon’s water and droughts the water condition and habitat drastically deteriorated.

Over the past two decades Blue Mountains Council and the Glenbrook Lagoon Society have ensured the lagoon has been rehabilitated. The dedicated efforts of the lagoon’s bushcare group together with expert conservationists, to remove noxious water weed has meant the lagoon is once again flourishing with native vegetation and wildlife. 

Mountains landscape painter, Corinne Loxton is currently exploring the spirit of Glenbrook Lagoon and painting plein air with a series of paintings to be exhibited in October in Katoomba.

“Working directly from the landscape enables me to respond immediately to the texture and feel of the place,” Loxton said.

“I am fascinated by the stillness that pervades the lagoon, despite it being a thriving ecosystem, echoing with bird song, frog chirruping and the rustling of leaves and reeds.”

Loxton’s paintings feature the various perspectives of the lagoon, from the 1.5km circuit walk. Most recently she has been working along Glenbrook Road, amongst the Angophora costata and other large eucalypts that grow between the shoreline and the road. These paintings reflect her experience of looking through the trunks, that stand like timeless sentinels, towards the glimmering water beyond. They evoke the changing phenomena of weather, light and season, demonstrating Loxton’s close attention to and intimate relationship with the lagoon.

Loxton’s exhibition runs from October 11-29 and promises to be a worthy celebration of this jewel of the region. 

“I hope my paintings will exemplify the beauty and significance of the lagoon and encourage visitors to connect with this amazing place.”

In September interested residents can learn to paint plein air with Loxton at the lagoon in the workshop, ‘Capturing the Spirit of Landscape’ on September 15-16.