Springwood pool to get ozone filtration

Forget massive social media campaigns: Apart from some emails and a little Facebook action, Jan Campbell mostly took the old-fashioned route and handed out hundreds of flyers about her dream of ozone filtration at Springwood pool.

And it paid off - Ms Campbell's project garnered the most votes in the state government's My Community Project, winning a $150,000 grant to upgrade the pool's chlorine system with healthier ozone.

"I think the leaflets helped a lot," Ms Campbell said. "And I spoke to people personally. I think that was a very powerful way to gain their attention, their confidence and support."

She even donned beach towel and goggles with her son Jochen in Springwood's town square to draw greater attention to her plan.

Jan Campbell and her son, Jochen, handing out leaflets in Springwood town centre.

Jan Campbell and her son, Jochen, handing out leaflets in Springwood town centre.

Ms Campbell, a regular swimmer, began investigating ozone after suffering a bad reaction to the chlorine at Springwood.

She discovered that it is an oxygen based, natural and environmentally friendly alternative, offering the same protection against bacteria and viruses without the unwanted side effects such as sore eyes and respiratory problems.

Most elite pools around the world have converted to ozone, Ms Campbell said.

She was very grateful to all who voted for her proposal as well as to the state government for making such a grant available to individuals not just organisations and to council, which backed the project.

The ozone project got 2,871 points (voters could allocate between one and 10 points to their favourites). The other successful project in the Blue Mountains was Blaxland High School P&C, which won $200,000 to upgrade to the performing arts space at the school, including new lights, tiered chairs, projection system, improved sound system and dressing rooms.

Penrith MP Stuart Ayres with Lower Mountains Rotary Club members at Glenbrook's Whitton Park. A Rotary project to build all-abilities parking and pathway to the existing shelter as well as wheelchair-friendly picnic furniture was awarded $55,000 in the My Community Project initiative.

Penrith MP Stuart Ayres with Lower Mountains Rotary Club members at Glenbrook's Whitton Park. A Rotary project to build all-abilities parking and pathway to the existing shelter as well as wheelchair-friendly picnic furniture was awarded $55,000 in the My Community Project initiative.

Three projects voted for in the Penrith electorate will also benefit the Mountains: $200,000 will go to a footpath from Glenbrook village to the railway bridge on Wilson Way, Blaxland; Whitton Park in Glenbrook will get $55,000 to build all-abilities parking and pathway to the existing iconic shelter as well as wheelchair-friendly picnic furniture; and Lapstone Public School won $25,000 to provide shade and shelter to spectators at the school's multi-purpose sports court.

Blue Mountains mayor Mark Greenhill congratulated the Blue Mountains community members who nominated the Springwood pool and Wilson Way projects and council officers for their support.

"Both projects are great news for the Blue Mountains," he said.

"The new footpath in Glenbrook will provide better access for residents in the area - in particular those who use prams, wheelchairs or walking frames. It will also mean better access to Glenbrook Lagoon.

"The upgraded filtration system at Springwood Aquatic Centre provides an eco-friendly alternative to chlorine."

Penrith MP Stuart Ayres said: "I'd like to thank all the community groups that participated in the program and advocated passionately for their local projects.

"While the NSW Government is getting on with delivering major infrastructure projects, we also understand the importance of local community projects to improve our local facilities."