Heard but not seen: the frogs of the Blue Mountains

Striped Marsh Frog, Limnodynastes peronii at Glenbrook.

Striped Marsh Frog, Limnodynastes peronii at Glenbrook.

The Blue Mountains is home to around 20 species of frog however they are usually heard and not seen. You may be lucky to see them hopping along the road during or shortly after rain but you are more likely to hear them calling from or around bodies of water.

The three most common species you may encounter in the Blue Mountains are:

  • Common Eastern Froglet, Crinia signifera
  • Striped Marsh Frog, Limnodynastes peronii
  • Peron's Tree Frog, Litoria peronii

Common Eastern Froglets are the most common and can be heard frequently after rain, calling from small puddles and other flooded areas. Striped Marsh Frogs sound like a tennis ball being hit and will call from just about any water body close to the ground.

Peron's Tree Frog has a call that sounds like a cackle and they may often be seen at windows hunting insects attracted by lights.

Green Tree Frogs, Litoria caerulea, used to be common in the Blue Mountains but are now rarely seen. They are still common in the Hawkesbury as well as throughout their range (north of Sydney and across northern Australia).

Despite its common name, the Blue Mountains Tree Frog, Litoria citropa, is only rarely encountered.

Another uncommon species is the Red-Crowned Toadlet, Pseudophryne australis. They have a very quiet call that sounds like marbles being rubbed together.

If you want to learn more about frogs in the Blue Mountains (and throughout Australia) visit www.frogid.net.au or download the free FrogID app.

Peron's Tree Frog at Glenbrook. It has a call that sounds like a cackle and they may often be seen at windows hunting insects attracted by lights. Photo: Andrew Trevor-Jones

Peron's Tree Frog at Glenbrook. It has a call that sounds like a cackle and they may often be seen at windows hunting insects attracted by lights. Photo: Andrew Trevor-Jones

  • Andrew Trevor- Jones is a Frog ID Validator Herpetology at the Australian Museum