Environmental cause behind sculpture at St Canice's

Moving the soil: Angie Ho and Emilio Micallef with their ants, which play a vital role in soil health.
Moving the soil: Angie Ho and Emilio Micallef with their ants, which play a vital role in soil health.

St Canice's annual Sculpture at School is on now, with the theme of "saving our soil".

Environmental concerns regularly form the basis of the exhibition, with previous years looking at saving seas and saving trees.

Soil was selected because of its vital role in ecosystems, said principal Mark Geerligs, quoting Mahatma Gandhi: "We must not underestimate the importance of soil in our lives... We need to protect it from industrial waste, fuel leakage, bad soil management."

It also needed to be protected for the digging animals of the world, which turn soil over, aerate it, fertilise it and help spread seeds, Mr Geerligs said.

St Canice's younger students have created art which looks at burrowing animals wombats, echidnas and ants, while the older pupils focused on Pablo Picasso, both because of his ability to see things differently and his love of creating in clay, a vital part of many soils.

The stage three students each made a Picasso-inspired sculpture and wrote a letter from one person's perspective to another.

There is also a photographic exhibition at the school, with works taken by parents, teachers and students.

At the exhibition's opening on Sunday, Mr Geerligs unveiled a beautiful leadlight window designed by Leanne Tobin and created by Rodney Marshall which incorporates the school's totem, the Three Sisters, and reflects its history with the Sisters of Charity, who ran it until 2017.

The exhibition is open 9am-3pm until Friday.