Rubik's Cube club in the Mid Mountains

It's the most famous "twisty puzzle" that exists and Springwood dad, Robert Musgrave thought it was about time it had its own Mountains club to honour it.

Blue Mountains Cube Club started in early 2018 after Mr Musgrave met another dad, Brian Sneddon, from the Mountains at a speed cubing competition in Canberra.

Best selling toy ever: New cubers to the Mountains are Alexis Munoz, Liam West, Eric Downes, Jasper Musgrave and Noah Snedden at WCA Cube Competition Sydney, in August.

Best selling toy ever: New cubers to the Mountains are Alexis Munoz, Liam West, Eric Downes, Jasper Musgrave and Noah Snedden at WCA Cube Competition Sydney, in August.

"We discussed the idea of meeting up regularly, thinking there must be other people out there that are into Rubik's cubes as well," Mr Musgrave said.

"We had noticed that most kids (and adults) were using YouTube to learn new or faster techniques, which is a great tool for learning, but does lack the face-to-face camaraderie that we had seen at the official World Cube Association competitions."

They approached the Mid Mountains Neighbourhood Centre who offered to help. Since then, the group of about a dozen regulars has slowly grown into a family friendly group of core enthusiasts with different skill levels. Some are just learning and others on their way to becoming competent speed cubers.

"As far as we know this is the only regular cube club that we know of in wider Sydney area," he said

"It's been exciting to see the kids and some adults too, share techniques, improve on their skills. It always exciting when someone gets a new personal best."

Cube club meets at Mid Mountains Neighbourhood Centre on the fourth Saturday from 2-4pm.

"Some of the highlights the club has had over the last two years have been a live Skype chat with Australian world record holder Feliks Zemdegs, running a workshop presentation at HubCon - Pop Culture Expo and recently attending the Sydney WCA Cube Competition with five cube club kids participating."

Mr Musgrave said there was a "real energy" at the competitions, with the sound of hundreds of cubes clicking and whizzing as participants warm up for the next round.

"For me there is a lot of nostalgia attached to cubes, as it's a real icon of the 80s. I love that it's such a portable and practical puzzle that anyone can learn."

His son, Jasper Musgrave, 12, from Winmalee High, has about 30 different cubes and took up the hobby after his cousin solved the puzzle and passed along his cube. He loves competing.

"It's fun to collect all the different shapes and size [cubes] and meet other people that share the same interest and they can share tips with you on how to get faster," Jasper said.

The Rubik's Cube was invented by Professor ErnoRubik from Hungary in 1974. About 350 million cubes have been sold worldwide, making it the world's top-selling puzzle game.

It earned a place as a permanent exhibit in New York's Museum of Modern Art and has a dedicated following with almost 40,000 entries on YouTube featuring tutorials and video clips of quick solutions. It's believed the slowest attempt to solve the cube took 26 years.