David King: Valuing Country by sitting and observing

A picture can remind you of places and stories. Stories of Ngurra (Country) are for Burraandii (Yesterday), Yanguu (Today) and Burraanduu (Tomorrow).

Photo by David King: "This is one of my photos looking from my mother's clan Country Gedumba to my Grandfathers clan Country Burragorang".

Photo by David King: "This is one of my photos looking from my mother's clan Country Gedumba to my Grandfathers clan Country Burragorang".

In your places of abode or wherever your pathways go, you can observe and connect. At our sitting place, it is common to observe Wumburang (Yellow Tail Black Cockatoo). We have seasonal visitors who connect with us in the garden. These include Dyagula (Lyrebird), Dyirrugal (Brown Pigeon) and Wungadang (Wonga Pigeon). During one of these seasons the Mullyang (Eagle) flies high above our sitting place.

At night when the nocturnal animals are out, you can hear the calls of the Wulaa (possum). You can investigate the mindyii (heaven or sky) and see the thousands of jerras (stars).

Some nights you can even hear the murrungal (thunder) and the continual echoes, bouncing off rock walls across the mountainous valleys. If you connect and observe long enough, the Buddayak (owl) will sit with you. Then on the full moon the Burri (Wallaby) will join you. Being connected brings peace, you understand the surrounding landscape and sounds.

Whenever someone asks our Aboriginal community how to keep Country strong, it comes down to observation and connection. This allows Gunai Dhaura (Mother Earth) and everything within our Ngurra mai dyin (native place Country) to flow.

All of us can enjoy Country by sitting and observing.